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Blog
One year ago around Halloween, The Guardian Life Insurance Company of AmericaÆ posted a cute video on Facebook about Halloween costumes that increased their social content engagement by a staggering 655 percent.

By employing a powerful digital strategy shaped by insights based on social conversations, they were able to identify the right audience for their brand (DIY Parents), the right content for that audience (Halloween costumes), and exactly the right time for them to consume it.

Guardian Head of Corporate Digital & Social Mari Pagliughi sat down for a fireside chat with Networked Insights CEO Dan Neely at the Argyle Digital Marketing Forum in NYC last year to help explain why the campaign was such a success.

Halloween is fast approaching, so we thought we’d share some of what we learned about how Guardian drove spooktacular results with this campaign.


The Challenge: Connecting With the Right Audience

Guardian began this campaign in an attempt to grow their social community and increase their audience engagement.

“We wanted to get closer to the needs, wants and desires of the working American, and really bring to bear whatís in the hearts and minds of our consumers and align that with our content,” said Pagliughi.

They had been successfully creating valuable content, but they wanted to garner more engagement with their video content.

Knowing they wanted to go outside the traditional insurance content strategy, they used Networked Insights technology to help optimize their content campaigns, to better understand what their audiences were talking about beyond just products and brands.


The Solution: Insights Based on Social Conversations

Using Networked Insights powerful audience analytics engine Kairos, they found out that parents love DIY crafts involving their kids, and that Halloween not only elicits the year-long-dormant-creative spark in youthful party-goers but in moms of young children, too.

After understanding the audience (parents), and the type of content (DIY crafts), the final key element they needed to know was when exactly they should post the video to provide the best opportunity for engagement.

Analyzing conversation trends, they identified that a lot of the do-it-yourself type content was happening around Halloween.

Digging deeper, they were able to pinpoint the exact day that conversations peaked for DIY crafts with parents and children, which was Oct. 3. With just a few weeks shy of the holiday, parents have enough time to create unique and adorable costumes, like the gumball machine shown in the video below.  

The Results: BubbleGum Baby FTW

When they posted the short video, complete with the items needed for the costume, how to make it, and the full outfit was worn by a baby, the post surpassed usual engagement numbers compared to previous posts Guardian had shared.

“We found there was a real need to be relevant and engaging in real-time and be responsive to what consumers are thinking about,” said Pagliughi.

Within the first three days, the video garnered 40,000 views. This post got more than 1,000 engagements, 655 percent higher than their previous video post. In total, the post was shared hundreds of times, which validates how engaging the content was. Additionally, itís rare for people on social media to be polite and kind to each other, and on this post, almost all of the comments were positive.

“We were super excited to see that there was actual real engagement going on,” said Pagliughi. “We had digital eyeballs we would never have had.”

If you want to hear the fireside chat with Networked Insights CEO Dan Neely and Guardian Head of Digital Communications Mari Pagliughi, click below:


Take a look at the video and share your thoughts with us using #NIGumball. To learn more about Networked Insights and how to leverage a similar process to increase engagement, head to www.networkedinsights

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Blog
Each week we will dig into a hot topic dominating social conversations and explore what matters to major audiences and influencers, using our audience intelligence engine Kairos and our audience marketing platform audience.ai to instantly gather insights from billions of real-time data points.

Read on to find out what weíre talking about this week (hint: it rhymes with schmillenials).

Audiences Networked Insights Style

Depending on the audience we are seeking, our methodology varies. However, for the week ending on the 29th, we explored conversations that the love-to-hate-hate-to-love-group-blamed-for-killing-everything, the rosy-colored-educated-and-lazy millennials.

To determine who fits within this audience, we classified people who self-identified in social conversations or in their bios as millennials.

It may sound simple, but scanning and classifying millions of conversations and millions of profiles is a significant task that our artificial intelligence engine Kairos completes in mere seconds (thankfully).

What’s grinding their gears this week?

Millennials sure have had a lot to say! They’ve shared more than 5.2 million posts across all social platforms, surpassing all other groups in our 20-plus syndicated audience list.

That means they’ve had, 2 million more convos than moms; double the number of convos that dads had and nearly 3 million more online convos than affluent professionals.

So if you’re trying to get ahold of an 80s-born-90s-raised kid? Our data says get online.





When they shared 5 million conversations, 21 percent of them held positive sentiments and 16 percent held negative sentiments. Looking into how they felt about the topics they discussed, 17 percent of their posts are about things they desire or want and 13 percent of people they love. So, overall they’re a chatty and happy bunch.

Specifically, they discussed sports brands more than anything else, which could be indicative of a knowledge in pop culture and current events. Of the 5.2 million posts, 30 percent were related to the NFL, 8 percent related to the NBA and 6 percent related to MLB.


Within such topics, their conversations jumped around from excitement of certain games coming up, to rants about their favorite athletesí political opinions, which have been making headlines recently.

Professional athletes are spanning more than the sports section because of the #takeaknee/#taketheknee and #boycottnfl/#nflboycott movements and millennials are claiming a significant share of the conversation, regardless of what side of the argument they’re on. We explored this topic here: #TakeAKnee and the Impact of Boycotting Brands.

So what else do Millennials care about?

Using audience.ai, we’re able to step out of the conversation and examine the audience holistically. Studying their conversations as a whole and not per topic, we have created a profile with details about their engagements and preferences and interests. We found that for millennials, music tops the charts.


Specifically, they prefer roots and rock music 1.43 times more than the general consumer. These include artists like, Dawes, Joan Osborne (we’re surprised, too) and Kid Rock.

However, for the greatest unique group of millennials, conversations are mostly about Alternative/Indie Pop Musicians.

Specifically, artists like, She & Him, Christopher Owens, The Metropole, Orkest, Broods and Relient K are driving significant volumes of conversations.

Finally, their third most valued interest is entertainment web brands like Edjing, Fandango, and Vevo.

For more information about millennials and their interests, check out www.networkedinsights.com.

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Analysis
This week, one of America’s greatest sporting events took place – the 137th annual Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show. The first Westminster show was held on May 8, 1877, making it the second-longest continuously held sporting event in the United States behind only the Kentucky Derby. Of course, many people are aware of this show because of the “cute” or “funny-looking” dogs that are featured, and some have even learned about the inner-workings of the judging process from watching Christopher Guest’s popular parody, Best in Show. This two-day event has been broadcasted by the USA Network for almost 30 years and has built a strong social presence in the last few years, in-part due to USA Network’s strong hand in enabling social viewer engagements. This year there were over 44K conversations during the show, and Banana Joe the Affenpinscher took the top prize—as well as a “#RoundOfAPaws” from more than 17K Twitter conversations. Wynn Las Vegas had set pretty good odds (11 to 1) on Banana Joe to take home the top prize, but for many people on social media, the Affenpinscher isn’t always their favorite pooch. Looking across the entire social web, Networked Insights has compiled the top 5 breeds (out of 187 Westminster recognized breeds) for each official category to determine who the real top dogs were.
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