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Dudes donning President Trump gear while munching on Reese’s, that was Halloween 2017 in a nutshell. Using the analytics engine Kairos, Networked Insights discovered the specific brands, celebrities and conversation topics that dominated Halloween this year and last year. Most surprising, the holiday isn’t just for kids—women actually dominate within the social sphere. And perhaps unsurprisingly, political costumes remained in the top five. Here’s what else Networked Insights found out: Last year, women were 1.38 times more likely to talk about Halloween costumes than men. They also represented 58 percent of all conversations about the candy-coated holiday. However this year, women had just 55 percent of all conversations about Halloween while men had about 45 percent. That means women wrote more than 200,000 more Halloween-related posts than men this year. And what were they talking about? Their makeup and the excitement about their costumes, specifically Cleopatra this year (and Harley Quinn last year). The popularity for President Trump may be waning in reality, but it was winning during Halloween.   Men, like last year, dressed up as The Don—moving President Trump from the second most popular costume in 2016, for men, to first place this year. But the the greatest upset from last year to this year was in candy. From reigning champion in 2016 to last place in 2017, Twix made the biggest move. Dropping to fifth most popular candy, by huge margins, Reese’s pulled to the top after being in second place last year. It is possible this upset is not directly related to a preference of peanut butter over caramel, but rather to a false rumor about the makers of Reese’s discontinuing the candy. Finally, for kids, Elsa remains a common costume choice despite its 2013 release. Check out the infographics for more: To learn more about Networked Insights, check out: www.networkedinsights.com.
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Blog
Dudes donning President Trump gear while munching on Reese’s, that was Halloween 2017 in a nutshell.

Using the analytics engine Kairos, Networked Insights discovered the specific brands, celebrities and conversation topics that dominated Halloween this year and last year. Most surprising, the holiday isn’t just for kids, women actually dominate within the social sphere. And perhaps unsurprisingly, political costumes remained in the top five.

Here’s what else Networked Insights found out:

Last year, women were 1.38 times more likely to talk about Halloween costumes than men. They also represented 58 percent of all conversations about the candy-coated holiday. However this year, women had just 55 percent of all conversations about Halloween while men had about 45 percent. That means women wrote more than 200,000 more Halloween-related posts than men this year.

And what were they talking about? Their makeup and the excitement about their costumes, specifically Cleopatra this year (and Harley Quinn last year).

The popularity for President Trump may be waning in reality, but it was winning during Halloween. Men, like last year, dressed up as The Don, moving President Trump from the second most popular costume in 2016, for men, to first place this year.

But the greatest upset from last year to this year was in candy.

From reigning champion in 2016 to the last place in 2017, Twix made the biggest move. Dropping to fifth most popular candy, by huge margins, Reese’s pulled to the top after being in second place last year. It is possible this upset is not directly related to a preference of peanut butter over caramel, but rather to a false rumor about the makers of Reese’s discontinuing the candy.

Finally, for kids, Elsa remains a common costume choice despite its 2013 release.

Check out the infographics for more:


To learn more about Networked Insights, check out: www.networkedinsights.com.
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Blog
One year ago around Halloween, The Guardian Life Insurance Company of AmericaÆ posted a cute video on Facebook about Halloween costumes that increased their social content engagement by a staggering 655 percent.

By employing a powerful digital strategy shaped by insights based on social conversations, they were able to identify the right audience for their brand (DIY Parents), the right content for that audience (Halloween costumes), and exactly the right time for them to consume it.

Guardian Head of Corporate Digital & Social Mari Pagliughi sat down for a fireside chat with Networked Insights CEO Dan Neely at the Argyle Digital Marketing Forum in NYC last year to help explain why the campaign was such a success.

Halloween is fast approaching, so we thought we’d share some of what we learned about how Guardian drove spooktacular results with this campaign.


The Challenge: Connecting With the Right Audience

Guardian began this campaign in an attempt to grow their social community and increase their audience engagement.

“We wanted to get closer to the needs, wants and desires of the working American, and really bring to bear whatís in the hearts and minds of our consumers and align that with our content,” said Pagliughi.

They had been successfully creating valuable content, but they wanted to garner more engagement with their video content.

Knowing they wanted to go outside the traditional insurance content strategy, they used Networked Insights technology to help optimize their content campaigns, to better understand what their audiences were talking about beyond just products and brands.


The Solution: Insights Based on Social Conversations

Using Networked Insights powerful audience analytics engine Kairos, they found out that parents love DIY crafts involving their kids, and that Halloween not only elicits the year-long-dormant-creative spark in youthful party-goers but in moms of young children, too.

After understanding the audience (parents), and the type of content (DIY crafts), the final key element they needed to know was when exactly they should post the video to provide the best opportunity for engagement.

Analyzing conversation trends, they identified that a lot of the do-it-yourself type content was happening around Halloween.

Digging deeper, they were able to pinpoint the exact day that conversations peaked for DIY crafts with parents and children, which was Oct. 3. With just a few weeks shy of the holiday, parents have enough time to create unique and adorable costumes, like the gumball machine shown in the video below.  

The Results: BubbleGum Baby FTW

When they posted the short video, complete with the items needed for the costume, how to make it, and the full outfit was worn by a baby, the post surpassed usual engagement numbers compared to previous posts Guardian had shared.

“We found there was a real need to be relevant and engaging in real-time and be responsive to what consumers are thinking about,” said Pagliughi.

Within the first three days, the video garnered 40,000 views. This post got more than 1,000 engagements, 655 percent higher than their previous video post. In total, the post was shared hundreds of times, which validates how engaging the content was. Additionally, itís rare for people on social media to be polite and kind to each other, and on this post, almost all of the comments were positive.

“We were super excited to see that there was actual real engagement going on,” said Pagliughi. “We had digital eyeballs we would never have had.”

If you want to hear the fireside chat with Networked Insights CEO Dan Neely and Guardian Head of Digital Communications Mari Pagliughi, click below:


Take a look at the video and share your thoughts with us using #NIGumball. To learn more about Networked Insights and how to leverage a similar process to increase engagement, head to www.networkedinsights

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